2008 News Archive

17TH INTERNATIONAL SAFER COMMUNITIES CONFERENCE 2008

17th International Safer Communities Conference was attended by over 500 delegates from 32 countries from around the world who came together for a common theme to make the world a safer place to live and work in. The conference was hosted by the city of Christchurch New Zealand on the week of 20th—23rd October 08.

Joan Pearson's presentation 17 page PDF, 1.6 MB

Geoff Parfitt from Riccarton Patrol attended and wrote this summary.


LOOKING BACK: 2008 NATIONAL TRAINING SEMINAR, AUCKLAND

Over three days in June, community patrols from all around New Zealand came together for their 2008 National Training Seminar.

View more photos from the 2008 National Training Seminar.


CPNZ TRAINING NEWSLETTER #01 14 OCTOBER 2008

Certificate in Community Patrolling Level 1

Certificate in Community Patrolling Level 2


SAFETY AWARDS RECOGNISE WIDE RANGE OF HEROES 30 SEPTEMBER 2008

When we think of heroes, images of caped crusaders leaping tall buildings spring to mind. Here in Wellington, heroes come in many different guises and heroic deeds can range from the spectacular to the everyday.

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Insp Kevin RIORDAN - Acting Area Commander Wellington City, Sharla ARNOLD - Coordinator of the Tawa Community Patrol, Steve HART - Coordinator of the Wellington North Community Patrol, Dave MERRALL - Coordinator of the Karori Community Patrol, Kerry PRENDERGAST - Mayor of Wellington

The fourth annual Wellington City Council Safety in the City Awards, tomorrow Wednesday 1 October, will honour an array of local heroes whose actions have helped keep Wellington and Wellingtonians safe.

Mayor Kerry Prendergast will present ten awards to individuals and organisations for their bravery, dedication and outstanding community spirit in safety issues.

"Safety is an important community issue and we all have a role to play in keeping ourselves safe. These people have gone that extra mile to keep others safe, and they should all be incredibly proud of themselves," Mayor Prendergast says.

Recipients range from a teenage lifesaver whose brave efforts to save a triathlon swimmer were highly praised by the Wellington coroner, to an MP who used his fist to stop an injured motorcyclist's leg bleeding, to people who saved their families from burning homes.

Mayor Prendergast says it's important to recognise acts of bravery, but it's equally important to give credit to those who work tirelessly on safety projects on a smaller scale to keep Wellington safe. "These people often get little recognition for their work, so it's fantastic to honour them alongside the spectacular stories."

'Everyday hero' recipients include a woman who works to eradicate graffiti and vandalism on part of the Town Belt and three community patrols consisting of volunteers who walk the streets of their local area to ensure residents are safe.

 


NELSON NIGHT WATCH VOLUNTEERS RECOGNISED BY POLICE 4 SEPTEMBER 2008

Volunteers were also recognised when Nelson Police held a pay parade in August to present long-service and good-conduct medals to police staff.

Three members of Nelson’s Night Watch volunteers were presented with a District Commander’s Commendation - Laurie Christian, Eric Stewart and Betty Van Rooyen.

Mr Christian and Stewart were both involved in helping to set up the patrol 14 years ago and are still active patrollers.

Mrs Van Rooyen is the patrol coordinator and joined the patrol shortly after moving to New Zealand in 2002 from South Africa.


ASHBURTON TOWN WATCH NAMED RUNNER-UP IN TRUSTPOWER VOLUNTEER AWARDS 21 JULY 2008

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Ashburton Town Watch achieved 2nd placing at the TrustPower Volunteer Awards held in Ashburton on 9th June 2008.

The community patrol was set up in 1985 by members of the local CB and 4 Wheel Drive clubs following concerns about increased violent offending and damage occurring in the community. Patrol members initially used their own vehicles but were fortunate to be offered the use of a Council car.

In 1994 a generous grant from the Kiwanis Club of Ashburton enabled the patrol to purchase its first patrol car and the Ashburton Trust supplied hand held radios. This car was replaced in 2002 and again in 2007. The car is garaged at the Ashburton Police station.

The patrol acts as eyes and ears for the Police from whom they get excellent support. Extra patrols are put on for special events such as the Methven Rodeo and Big Air Freestyle MotoX which is attended by more than 10,000 people.

Ashburton Town Watch travels over 10,000 kilometers a year and relies mainly on donations for the running expenses and maintenance of their patrol car. They recently ran a successful fundraiser barbeque at the two-day Ashburton Motorhome Show, the biggest mobile home show in New Zealand.


BE AWARE SIGNS RELEASED AT NATIONAL TRAINING SEMINAR 11 JULY 2008 

Community Patrols of New Zealand have developed in consultation with Police and Local Government New Zealand a BE AWARE sign which was released at the national training seminar in June.

The signs are intended to deter potential offenders by highlighting the fact that patrols may be in the area. The best location for the signs will be determined locally.

There are now over 100 community patrol groups throughout New Zealand making a significant contribution to reducing crime.

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The new signs are being held by Willie Iosia (MC for the national training seminar) and newly
elected CPNZ Chairman Robert Fowler.


CRIME WATCH PATROL VISITS FO GUANG SHAN TEMPLE 8 JULY 2008

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A meeting attended by the Sangha, Chairman of the BLIA, Peter Young, and members of each sub-chapter was held on Wednesday 4 June at Fo Guang Shan Temple, North Island, New Zealand, to the raise awareness, of both local and Chinese members, to Crime Watch Patrol. National Party MP, Pansy Wong, who has a close association with the Temple and holds the volunteers in high regard, introduced Dick Marshall, Chairperson of the Botany Patrol, and Brian Rouse, Chairperson of the Flat Bush Patrol.

Crime Watch Patrol is a highly trained and organised group of people who patrol the streets, car parks and particular ‘hot-spots’ with the purpose of reporting important incidents and emergencies to the Police. Their, non-confrontational, role is to keep the community safe by raising public awareness of criminal activity in the area, educating the public and other organisations such as Neighbourhood Watch and co-operating closely with the Police.

Southeast Auckland has 5 patrol areas with a total of 200 volunteer patrollers and 8 patrol cars. Botany and Flat Bush, the areas closest to the Temple, currently have 75 volunteer patrollers and 3 cars to cover three shifts a day, seven days a week. However, to achieve their goal to increase the number of volunteer patrollers to 500 and 20 patrol cars in the next three years they need many more volunteers and this was one of the reasons for talking to the members. The commitment of joining is to be available for two, three hour shifts each month. Induction training is given, followed my more advanced instruction after a three month probation period.

The members showed considerable interest in Crime Watch Patrol and asked insightful questions. Iris was appointed as co-ordinator to liaise with the Chairpersons of the Botany and Flat Bush Patrols to arrange for them to accompanying a patrol team. The co-ordinator will report back to the members and then organise volunteer applications.

At the end of the meeting The Venerable Abbess Manshin thanked Pansy Wong and the Chairpersons of the Botany and Flat Bush Crime Watch Patrols for giving the members an opportunity to consider the important issue of crime prevention, anticipating that positive action will follow. It is important that members of the Temple work within the local community to demonstrate their compassion to every sentient being.

 


PATROL OBSERVATIONS LEAD TO ARREST OF MAN IN POSSESSION OF AN IMITATION PISTOL 1 JULY 2008

 

At 0147 on the 1 th June, while parked up in the Johnsonville Woolworths Carpark, the Wellington North Community Patrol saw a vehicle pull into the carpark with five occupants.

Once the vehicle parked, the driver and a passenger left the vehicle. The patrol noticed that the passenger had a handgun at his side. The patrol immediately contacted the Police Communications Centre and watched the offender until Police arrived.

When the Police arrived, they arrested the offender in possession of what turned out to be a very realistic replica handgun.

The patrol members involved in the incident were required to give formal statements and did not arrive home till very late that morning.

A man has appeared in the Wellington District Court charged with unlawfully carrying and presenting an imitation firearm.

 


NATIONAL RECOGNITION FOR SOUTH DUNEDIN COMMUNITY PATROLLERS 26 JUNE 2008

 

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By Brenda Harwood, The Star, Dunedin

South Dunedin Community Patrol stalwarts Tubby Hopkins (centre) and Claire Metcalfe (left) flew the flag for Dunedin in style recently at the Community Patrols of New Zealand national training seminar.

During the event, held in Auckland on June 14 and 15, Mr Hopkins was made national CPNZ deputy chairman and Mrs Metcalfe was presented with a citation for her efforts in helping Dunedin police to catch an armed fugitive last year.

‘‘It was really pleasing to see our patrol doing well at national level,'' Mr Hopkins said.

Mrs Metcalfe received her citation for her actions in May last year, when she put two and two together after hearing about a police manhunt. Spotting a suspicious vehicle parked in her street, she observed a sleeping man through its window and contacted police. The man was subsequently arrested by the armed offenders squad.

‘‘I am certain that the training I have received through CPNZ had a lot to do with it,'' Mrs Metcalfe said.

‘‘You become more aware of things that are out of the ordinary or that are suspicious,'' she said.

Founded in 2002, the South Dunedin Community Patrol sends pairs of volunteers out from its base at South Dunedin Police Station on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights to drive around the streets and watch for unusual or suspicious activity.

The North Dunedin Community Patrol fulfils a similar role.

‘‘We operate in a private capacity to provide an extra set of eyes and ears for the police,'' Mr Hopkins said.

‘‘Our members have the common purpose of helping to reduce crime and make our community safer.''

In the past year, the South Dunedin Community Patrol spent 1180 hours on the job, covered 8602km, and attended 291 incidents ranging from disorder to missing persons. Members also reported problems with street lighting, road signs, traffic signals and any other issues.

At present, the patrol had 25 members and more were needed for it to be at optimum operating capacity, Mr Hopkins said.

- Anyone who would like to join the patrol is asked to phone senior constable Ruth Parson, of South Dunedin Police, on 03-455-1199.


CPNZ SUBSCRIBES TO THE COMMUNITY EDITION 14 JANUARY 2008

Police has invited Community Patrols of New Zealand and Neighbourhood Support New Zealand to contribute to and receive the Police online monthly community newsletter, the Community Edition.

Both CPNZ and Neighbourhood Support have agreed that the email addresses collected for their respective newsletters can be used for the Community Edition. The Community Edition is distributed for the Police by the same company that distributed the CPNZ and Neighbourhood Support newsletters so the email addresses are not being divulged.

It is likely that many people may already be receiving two or all three of the newsletters so any duplicated addresses will be automatically eliminated in the process. People who do not want to receive the Community Edition can opt out when the first edition arrives in February 2008.

 


VOLUNTEERS KEEP WAIKATO SAFER 12 JANUARY 2008

 

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KEEPING WATCH: Michael Gill and Marjorie
Hodgson keep an eye out at Bridal Vail Falls.

Volunteers are keeping thieves at bay by watching out at key spots all over the Waikato. Belinda Feek reports.

As people enjoy their favourite tourist spot this summer, there's another group of people giving up their time to watch over their belongings.

They are members of the Community Patrols of New Zealand, who give hours of their time every month making sure vehicles and property are safe as people visit various tourist spots.

Keeping potential thieves away from vehicles at Bridal Veil Falls, near Raglan, this week were members of the Raglan Night Owl community patrol, Michael Gill and his associate Marjorie Hodgson.

Not only do they patrol the town's streets at night, but they also monitor various tourist spots during the day.

Mr Gill said since their branch was formed 10 years ago, the patrol had had a huge impact on reducing the thefts from vehicles in local holiday hot spots.

"It's been huge. The first year of operation the night time crime stats (in Raglan) dropped by 15 per cent."

Ms Hodgson is proud of still giving her time despite turning 83 in April. She became involved to help get the "naughty kids" off the streets.

"When I first started it was terrible. I see a few of them now and they've grown and married and all have their own kids."

The pair had been with the patrols since it was instigated by fellow Raglan resident, and then-local policeman, Kevin Holmes.

Mr Holmes, now a Hamilton fire safety officer, said a public meeting in the town helped seal the idea after a number of break-ins at the local kindergarten.

"It's been great. It really has made a difference ... I know the police really appreciate it.

"Bridal Veil Falls is a hot spot for thefts from vehicles. If we can get out there and do our bit it frees (police) up to do other things. The last thing we want is people coming to Raglan and having their vehicles cleaned out."

Fourteen community patrols patrol North Hamilton, West Hamilton, Ngatea, Paeroa, Waihi, Whitianga, Thames and Te Awamutu.